Coniglio Pizzaiola

Ingredients

  • 1 2 1/2–3-pound rabbit, quartered
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 14-ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes, preferably San Marzano

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Season rabbit with salt and pepper. Heat 2 Tbsp. olive oil in a large ovenproof pot over medium-high heat. Working in batches, cook rabbit until golden brown, 2–3 minutes per side. Transfer rabbit to a plate. Add remaining 2 Tbsp. oil to pot. Add onions; sauté until beginning to soften, about 4 minutes. Add garlic, oregano, and basil; reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring often, until soft, about 3 minutes. Add wine; simmer until slightly reduced, about 2 minutes. Crush tomatoes by hand; add to pot with juices from can. Add 1/2 cup water; bring to a boil. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Return rabbit to pot; cover.

  • Transfer pot to oven and braise until meat is tender and almost falling off the bone, about 1 1/4 hours. Transfer meat to a platter. Reduce sauce in pot over medium-high heat until thickened, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Pour sauce over rabbit.

Recipe by Zeppoli in Collingswood NJ

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 542.1 %Calories from Fat 49.4 Fat (g) 29.8 Saturated Fat (g) 6.7 Cholesterol (mg) 161.6 Carbohydrates (g) 6.6 Dietary Fiber (g) 1.3 Total Sugars (g) 3.6 Net Carbs (g) 5.3 Protein (g) 58.0 Sodium (mg) 328.9Reviews Section

Index

We like to think of Memorie di Angelina as more of an online cookbook than a blog, a resource you can use really use as a reference as you would any other cookbook. This index will allow you to quick scan all the recipes on the site. Each index page represents a category of recipes, listed in alphabetical order by main ingredient. The pages follow the structure of a traditional Italian meal:

Antipasti: Literally meaning ‘before the meal’, these are small dishes that form the first course of a formal Italian meal. This type of dish is sometimes translated as hors d’oeuvre or appetizer, but antipasti are eaten at the table and, when included, are (despite the name) considered an integral part of the meal. Antipasti are usually reserved for special occasions, although many can double as primi, secondi contorni or snacks.

Primi piatti: Pasta, rice, soup, gnocchi and other farinaceous dishes that are the usual first course in a full Italian meal. This category is divided into sub-categories according to type, starting, of course, with the ne plus ultra of Italian cuisine, pasta.

Secondi piatti: The dishes that make up the second course of a full Italian meal, and can feature meat, fish or (less usually) vegetables. In English, we might be tempted to call this the ‘main’ course of the meal, but that concept does not apply in Italian food culture. The primo and secondo have equal standing in an Italian meal that includes both. This category is also divided into sub-categories according to the main ingredient, starting with beef.

Contorni and Salads: Vegetable side dishes and salads, usually served to accompany the secondo, salads are sometimes served as a separate course.

Desserts: You won’t find too many dessert recipes on this blog yet. Dessert, in our house, more often than not, is a piece or two of fresh fruit. But some of the more common home-style desserts are featured here, as well as some of my favorite frozen desserts.

Below these main categories, you will find pages for miscellaneous items that don’t fit well within any particular course (including sauces, baked goods, beverages and snack foods) as well as non-Italian dishes. As these categories grow, they may need to be sub-divided.

Some of the categories begin with one or more ‘master’ recipes that explain basic techniques that you will use in countless other recipes. The pasta sub-category, for example, begins with “Fresh Egg Pasta, How to Make”. These recipes (and a few others of particular importance) are in bold type. After the master recipes, you will find an alphabetical list of all the other recipes in that category or sub-category. You may notice recipes appearing more than once in the index, because a number of recipes (especially the vegetables) can do double or even triple duty. For example, insalata caprese is typically an antipasto, but it can also make for a light vegetarian secondo, so it is listed twice.

The names of recipes are listed in the original Italian, followed by a short English translation, sometimes a literal translation or, where that would only confuse things, a short description. The Italian name is hyperlinked, so that clicking on the name of a recipe will open up the recipe post.

So, gentle Reader, you are cordially invited to dig in, look around, and perhaps discover some dishes that you may have missed. Hope you enjoy the visit!


Primi piatti

Cacio e pepe (Pasta with Pecorino and Black Pepper)
Calamarata con salsiccia ricotta e piselli (Calamarata Pasta with Sausage, Ricotta and Peas)
Carbonara vegetariana (Vegetarian Carbonara)
Caserecce e fagiolini (Pasta and Green Beans)
Chiocciole con salsicce, piselli e ricotta (Little Shells with Sausage, Peas and Ricotta Cheese)
Conchiglie ripiene al forno (Stuffed Shells)

Gramigna con salsiccia (Curlycue Pasta with Sausage)

Lasagne agli asparagi (Asparagus Lasagna)
Lasagne alla bolognese (Bologna-Style Lasagna)
Lasagna di carnevale (Neapolitan-Style Lasagna)
Lasagne in bianco (‘White’ aka tomato-less lasagne)
Linguine con alici (Linguini with Anchovies)
Linguine al limone (Linguini with Lemon)
Linguine al vino rosso (Linguine with Red Wine Sauce)

Malloreddus alla campidanese (Sardinian Gnocchetti with Sausage and Tomato Sauce)
Mezzelune al brasato (‘Half-Moon’ Pasta stuffed with Pot Roasted Beef)

Orecchiette ai broccoletti (Orecchiette with Broccoli Rabe)

Pasta alla capricciosella (Pasta with Squid, Mushrooms and Peas)
Pasta e ceci (Pasta and Chickpeas)
Pasta con la cicoria (Pasta with Chicory)

Pasta alla crema di peperoni (Pasta with Bell Pepper Cream Sauce)
Pasta e fagioli (Pasta and Bean, aka ‘Pasta Fazool’)
Pasta al forno (Baked Pasta with Meat Sauce)
Pasta alla gricia (Pasta with Guanciale and Pecorino Cheese)
Pasta con la mollica (Pasta with Toasted Breadcrumbs)
Pasta alla norma (Sicilian-style Pasta and Eggplant)
Pasta e lenticchie (Pasta and Lentils)
Pasta al pescespada (Pasta with Swordfish)
Pasta e piselli (Pasta and Peas)
Pasta con la ricotta (Pasta with Ricotta Cheese)
Pasta a risotto (Pasta made in the manner of risotto
Pasta al tonno (Pasta with Tunafish, the classic version)
Pasta al tonno al modo mio (Pasta with Tunafish “My Way”)
Pasta con la zucca alla napoletana (Pasta with Winter Squash, Neapolitan Style)
Pasta con zucchine e ricotta (Pasta with Zucchini and Ricotta Cheese)

Penne al baffo (Penne with Ham, Tomato and Cream Sauce)
Penne ai funghi (Penne with Mushrooms)
Penne ai peperoni e alici (Penne with Peppers and Anchovies)
Penne alla vodka (Penna with Vodka Cream Sauce)
Pesto alla trapanese (Sicilian-style Pesto Sauce for Pasta)

Pici all’aglione (Homemade Spaghetti with “Big Garlic” Sauce)
Pizzocheri alla valtellinese (Buckwheat Pasta from the Valtellina)

Ravioli al sugo di pomodoro (Home-made Ravioli with Tomato Sauce)
Rigatoni con spinaci e ricotta (Rigatoni with Spinach and Ricotta)

Spaghetti con la bottarga

Spaghetti con la bottarga (Spaghetti with Cured Fish Roe)
Spaghetti alla carbonara (Spaghetti with Eggs and Pancetta)
Spaghetti alle cipolle rosse e alici (Spaghetti with Red Onions and Anchovies)
Spaghetti alla Nerano (Spaghetti with Fried Zucchini and Provolone Cheese)
Spaghetti al nero di seppie (Spaghetti with Squid Ink)
Spaghetti con pomodoro crudo (Spaghetti with Fresh Tomato Sauce)
Spaghetti alla puttanesca (‘Whore-Style’ Spaghetti)

Spaghetti alla puveriello (Poor Man’s Spaghetti)
Spaghetti alle vongole (Spaghetti with Clam Sauce)
Spaghetti con le zucchini (Spaghetti with Fried Zucchini)
Spaghetti fatti in casa con pomodori al forno (Home-made Spaghetti with Oven-Roasted Tomatoes)
Spaghettini al caviale di salmone (Thin Spaghetti with Salmon Roe)
Strozzapretti ai funghi (‘Priest-Strangler’ Pasta with Mushrooms)

Tagliatelle carciofi e funghi (Tagliatelle with Artichokes and Mushrooms)
Tagliatelle alla crema di asparagi (Tagliatelle with Asparagus Purée)
Tagliatelle al tonno e panna (Tagliatelle with Tunafish Cream Sauce)
Tagliatelle alle zucchine (Tagliatelle with Zucchini)
Taglierini al sugo d’arrosto (Taglierini with Drippings from a Roast)
Tortelli di zucca (Pumpkin Ravioli)
Tonnarelli cacio e pepe (Square Spaghetti with Cheese and Pepper)
Tubetti cacio e uova (Tubetti with Egg and Cheese)
Zitoni al forno con le polpettine (Baked Ziti)

Rice

Recipe List

Insalata di riso (Rice Salad)
Insalata di riso con würstel (Rice Salad with Sliced Wieners)
Risi e bisi (Venetian-Style Rice and Peas)
Risotto agli asparagi (Risotto with Asparagus)
Riso in cagnone (Rice with Butter and Cheese)
Riso e lenticchie (Rice and Lentils)

Riso alla pilota (Pilot’s Rice from Mantova)
Riso coll’uvetta (Venetian-Jewish-Style Rice with Raisins for Hannukah)
Risotto allo champagne (Champagne Risotto)
Risotto alla crema di scampi (Risotto with Crayfish Purée)
Risotto all’indivia belga (Risotto with Belgian Endive)
Risotto alla milanese (Milanese-Style Risotto with Saffron)

Risotto al nero di seppia (‘Black’ Risotto with Cuttlefish Ink)
Risotto primavera (Risotto with Spring Vegetables)
Risotto al radicchio (Risotto with Radicchio)
Risotto al radicchio e Saint-André (Risotto with Radicchio and Saint-André Cheese)
Risotto verde (‘Green’ Risotto with Spinach)
Risotto alla zucca (Pumpkin Risotto)

Soup

Carabaccia (Tuscan Onion Soup)

Basic Techniques

Recipe List

Cacciucco di ceci (Tuscan Chickpea and Swiss Chard Soup)

Carabaccia (Tuscan Onion Soup)
Crema di cannellini (Pureed White Bean Soup)

Crema di lenticchie ai funghi trifolati (Pureed Lentil Soup with Sautéed Mushrooms)
Crema di zucca (Pureed Winter Squash Soup)
Jota Triestina (Bean and Sauerkraut Soup from Trieste)

Farinata di cavolo nero (Tuscan Kale and Polenta Soup)

Quadrucci in brodo (Pasta Squares in Broth)
Ribollita, La (Tuscan-Style ‘Reboiled’Vegetable Soup)
Sciusceddu alla messinese (Meatball Soup topped with Ricotta Soufflé)
Stracciatella alla Romana (Roman-Style Egg Drop Soup)
Zucchine cacio e uova (Zucchini Soup with Egg and Cheese)

Other primi

Basic Techniques

Recipe List

Couscous di pesce (Fish Couscous from Trapani)
Fazzoletti di crespelle (Savory Crepe ‘Handkerchiefs’)
Gnocchi ai funghi (Potato Gnocchi with Mushroom Cream Sauce)
Gnocchi al gorgonzola (Potato Gnocchi with Gorgonzola Cream Sauce)

Gnocchi alla sorrentina (Potato Gnocchi with Tomato Sauce and Mozzarella)
Gnocchi di patate con salsa di noci (Potato Gnocchi with Walnut Sauce)

Tiella pugliese (Puglian-Style Mussel and Potato Casserole)
Zuppa dei valdesi (Piedmontese Bread ‘Soup’)


LEPRE ALLA PIEMONTESE (HARE – SLOW BRAISE PIEDMONTESE STYLE)

This is a photo of a segmented hare ready to braise. The hare has been sitting in my freezer for about 6 weeks, but because it is very hard to find, I buy when I see it, irrespective of whether I am ready to cook it or not.

I chose an Ada Boni recipe for cooking hare in the Piedmontese style (recipe from Italian Regional Cooking, Bonanza Books 1995). Boni’s recipe is slightly different to other Piedmontese style recipes recipes I looked at and it includes cognac other recipes may also contain any of the following ingredients, for example: cinnamon, garlic, rosemary and juniper berries.

I use recipes as a guide and I alter quantities and ingredients to suit my tastes. I like spices and herbs and increased the quantities I prefer and used fresh herbs rather than the dry suggested in the recipe. Both Barolo and Barbera are wines of Piedmont and understandably Boni suggests using Barbera for the marinade wine, but I used a good quality Australian red wine and chose to drink the Italian. Chocolate smooths out the sauce and I used a greater amount than suggested and rather than adding 4 teaspoons of sugar I added very little sugar I like using stock and added some to the braising liquid.

I have not used Ada Boni’s words, but the procedure for preparing the hare is more or less what she suggests.

In Australia I have yet to purchase a hare with its liver, heart, little alone its blood – these are used to thicken the sauce towards the end of cooking.

I have written about hare before. See:

Interestingly enough, Alex the small friend in the photograph is now very much grown up.

Use an earthenware bowl for the marinade and a heavy bottomed saucepan with a well sealing lid to braise the hare.


From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Italian

English

Italian

English

Last Update: 2015-04-26
Usage Frequency: 2
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Italian

English

BEEF FILLETS WITH TOMATOES AND OREGANO

Last Update: 2013-12-08
Usage Frequency: 1
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Italian

English

Last Update: 2018-02-13
Usage Frequency: 1
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Italian

Cosciotto di pollo alla piastra

English

Last Update: 2018-09-19
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
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Italian

Petto di pollo alla griglia

English

Last Update: 2018-04-23
Usage Frequency: 1
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Italian

Non male neppure con il coniglio o il pollo alla cacciatora.

English

You can also eat them with cold meats or cheese, not bad either with rabbit or chicken cacciatore.

Last Update: 2018-02-13
Usage Frequency: 1
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Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta “Pollo alla creta”?

English

What's the right wine “Pollo alla creta” ?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
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Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta " Pollo alla creta "?

English

What's the right wine for " Chicken in the brick "?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
Usage Frequency: 1
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Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta “Pollo alla cacciatora”?

English

What's the right wine “Pollo alla cacciatora” ?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta " Pollo alla cacciatora "?

English

What's the right wine for " Chicken cacciatore, Italy-style "?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Italian

Il cibo e' molto buono, consiglio il pollo alla griglia!!

English

The food and 'very good, I recommend the grilled chicken !!

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Italian

Aggiungere il pollo alla borsa e lasciar per marinare per 15 minutes.

English

Add chicken to bag and allow to marinate for 15 minutes.

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Quality:
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Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta “Pollo alla Catalana” ?

English

What's the right wine “Pollo alla Catalana” ?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta " Pollo alla Catalana " ?

English

What's the right wine for " Pollo alla Catalana " ?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Italian

Qual è il vino giusto per la ricetta " Insalata di pollo alla senape "?

English

What's the right wine for " Mustard-flavored chicken salad "?

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Italian

Alle uova, alle proteine del pollo, alla neomicina, alla formaldeide e al 9-ottoxinolo.

English

To eggs, chicken proteins, neomycin, formaldehyde and octoxinol 9.

Last Update: 2012-04-12
Usage Frequency: 2
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Italian

Spero che voi vi prego di inviarmi le ricette per la salsa di carne e il pollo alla cacciatora.

English

I am hoping that you will please send me the recipes for the meat sauce and the chicken cacciatore.

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Italian

Pepico Aglio si sposa bene con carne, pesce, verdure o petto di pollo alla griglia.

English

Pepico Agliao is suitable for grilled meat, fish, vegetables or chicken breasts.

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Italian

Sì, abito qui, mi chiamo Jahn. È ora, credo, oggi cucino. C’è del pollo alla paprika.

English

Yes, I live here, my name’s Jahn. Today it’s – I mean, I’m cooking today. There’s chicken with peppers.

Last Update: 2018-02-13
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Italian

Oggi, la nostra mamma Graziella ha fatto per noi un impressionante ricetta italiana molto gustosa! Il magnifico Pollo alla Cacciatora.

English

Today, our awesome mamma Graziella has ready for us a very tasty italian Recipe!

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Veal Milanese: Tips for the Perfect Italian Recipe

Veal Milanese is a fast and easy-to-make recipe. But for the authentic Italian Veal Milanese, you have to follow a few simple steps.

  • First of all, THE MEAT: must be the veal loin with the bone 2/3 cm high (about 1 inch), pink and tender.
  • Second, NO FLOUR: for a perfect and crunchy breading, you have to dip the meat in the eggs and then in the breadcrumbs. DO NOT USE FLOUR, otherwise the breading will come off the meat once cooked.
  • The third key feature is BREADCRUMBS: homemade breadcrumbs are essential for perfect breading. So, if you can, do it yourself at home, with stale bread,breadsticks, flatbreads, crackersor taralli. In short, what you have in your pantry.
  • Last but not least, THE BUTTER: fry in butter and not in oil. The butter is an ingredient that is traditionally widely used in the regions of northern Italy. Frying in butter gives the veal Milanese an unmistakable flavor.

Five amazing pressure cooker meat tips & tricks!

The pressure cooker can tenderize the most stubborn cut of meat and turn tough chewy fibers into gelatin, but a few wrong moves can turn meat into a shriveled tasteless lump. Here are my do’s and don’ts for getting the most flavor out of your pressure cooked meat.

DO brown or broil it. Either give your meat a quick all-around sauté before starting a braise or tumble pressure steamed or boiled meat on a heat-proof platter and slide it under the broiler for a few minutes to add a beautiful I-‘ve-been-cooking-in-a-blasting-hot-oven-for-hours finish.

DON’T drown it. Liquid is your meat’s number one flavor-sucking enemy, but it’s your cooker’s best friend. That’s because there is almost no evaporation during pressure cooking- just 3-5% versus 30% evaporation during conventional cooking. While you may cover meat almost completely for a conventional braise, use just enough liquid for the cooker to reach pressure – during pressure cooking the meat will release it’s own juice and braise in that flavorful liquid, instead.

DO use fresh herbs. Whenever possible use fresh! Pressure cooking has a tendency to infuse the flavor of every ingredient in the cooker together. Herbs should give their fresh oils and water to your recipe, not absorb it. Toss fresh herbs in the cooker whole, stems and all, before closing the lid -the pressure will take care of the rest!

DON’T use thickeners. Flour, starch (potato or corn), and ingredients in prepared sauces and canned cream soups (agar, carrageeanan, modified food starch, etc.) should be added after pressure cooking . Otherwise, the cooking liquid will thicken the liquid the cooker needs to reach pressure making it difficult for it to boil and either scorch the bottom of the cooker or prevent it from reaching pressure altogether (or both). Add the thickener and simmer it into your dish when pressure cooking is finished.

DO take your time. Use natural release for most meat-centered pressure cooker recipes. It will slowly (10 to 20 minutes) bring the temperature of the super-heated meat down and prevent all of the high-temperature-juice inside from evaporating away in a aromatic cloud and leaving behind a nearly inedible and definitely tasteless hunk of fibers that used to be meat. Oh, and by the way, natural release means to just turn the heat off and forget about your pressure cooker for about 10 minutes while the pressure comes down all by itself.


Olive recipes

Olives are a cornerstone of Mediterranean cuisine, but if there’s one country that knows how to use them to their full potential, it’s Italy. Pressed for their oil, eaten on their own or incorporated into all sorts of olive recipes, it seems everything but the stone can be used in one way or another.

Olives themselves ­– whether black or green – are full of salty, sharp flavours, transforming humdrum dishes into something special. Apart from scattering them over pizza they work very well in pasta sauces, such as Spaghetti alla puttanesca. For something a bit more adventurous, try the Costardi Brothers’ Red mullet with capers, black olive and tomato, or Eugenio Boer’s ‘Ligurian cod’ – salt cod with tomato, olive cream and potato. If you fancy something a little easier to cook but just as delicious, Manuela Zangara’s Aubergine caponata or Antonella la Macchia’s Scacciata catanese – a type of Sicilian cheese pie.

When buying olives, you tend to get what you pay for – the cheaper jars of black olives in brine tend to be just dyed unripe green olives, which taste nothing like the real deal.


Naples Rolls Out A New, Fine-Tuned Dough

A handful of young upstarts are changing Naples' traditional pizza-making habits, bolstered by a new flour called Nuvola (Italian for "cloud"), developed by Italian miller Caputo. (Courtesy of Carlo Sammarco)

Ever since the quasimythic birth of margherita pizza in Naples in 1889, Neapolitan pizzaioli have regarded their variety as the only true pizza, looking down upon differing styles in Brooklyn, Chatham, Chicago, Detroit, Kansas City, Melbourne, New Haven, Stockholm and Tokyo. For more than a century, they have seen anything beyond their Neapolitan borders as little more than nuanced blasphemy, the squabbling dialects of errant heretics. To them, non-Naples pies have counted as pizza about as much as Rob counts as a Kardashian.

But as Naples doubled down on tradition decade after decade, its prestige pies took on a dusty flavor amid a global renaissance. "My father and grandfather never strayed," 29-year-old Vincenzo Capuano, a fourth-generation Neapolitan pizzaiolo, said in Italian by way of a translator. "Tradition strengthened us but it also held us back." So Capuano did something his ancestors never did: He listened to the heretics, despite not becoming a convert. "I can learn from any pizza - even Chicago deep dish," he said. "My family and my Naples never thought that before."

This year, a handful of young upstarts - including Capuano - are changing Naples' habits, bolstered by a new flour developed by Italian miller Caputo, a gold standard in pizza flour backed by Vera Pizza Napoletana, Naples' governing authority on pizza authenticity ("Naples is married to Caputo," said Capuano.) Caputo regularly makes new flours - Americana, for U.S.-style dough, debuted in 2016 - but the Neapolitan version hasn't changed much since 1889. Until now.

"I feel like a rebel now, a radical," said Capuano. "People in Naples told me my pizzeria would be closed in two months. Now I'm opening my third."

The new flour is called Nuvola (Italian for "cloud"). To harvest it, the combines aren't sent into fields until rainy season, late in the game, so the grains are very mature and rustic, almost aged. Antimo Caputo, the third-generation CEO of the flour producer, likens it to passito, a raisin wine. The chemical effect, he said, is that the grain is higher in fiber, with more bran, minerals, germ, protein and amylase, a sugar enzyme that allows a crème brûlée sense of character, deeply charred but not bitter.

Broadly, the maturation enables faster natural fermentation, although the dough needs roughly 24 hours of proofing (mass-market pizza companies, like Domino's, turbo-boost their fermentation for same-day results with added sugar, an accelerant for yeast.) A lactic acid buildup in Nuvola's natural fermentation process gives the end product some creaminess. It notably has no need for potassium bromate, a carcinogen that is used in the U.S. but is banned in Canada, China, the European Union and many other nations (it is regulated in California).

And, whereas most pizza doughs have a hydration point of 62, Nuvola's higher concentration of soluble starch allows for a wider hydration range, as high as 100, creating a charred, crispier, puffier, lighter crust that is melty, more digestible and yields a more bouncy, chewy cornicione (pizza-speak for the pie's raised rim).

Nuvola's higher concentration of soluble starch creates a charred, crispier, puffier, lighter crust that is melty, more digestible and yields a more bouncy, chewy cornicione (pizza-speak for the pie's raised rim.)

"The starting point is a new generation of pizza-makers. More exact. More specific. This is a tough grain that was previously used for breads, not pizza. It was not in the older generations' mind to approach the dough on this exact level. Nuvola is only possible because of this increase in skill and specifics," said Caputo, who added that it took almost a year to create a pizza-ready adaptation of the grain. "The traditional approach was a Mercedes with automatic shifting. Nuvola is a Ferrari with manual shift. It's the Ferrari of flours: hard to drive but a beautiful experience if you know what you're doing."

Caputo's criticism of Italy's long-celebrated quanto basta (as needed) approach to culinary technique is striking. He sounds downright Brooklynite, where bespoke experimentation is mainstream.

Nuvola's higher concentration of soluble starch creates a charred, crispier, puffier, lighter crust that is melty, more digestible and yields a more bouncy, chewy cornicione (pizza-speak for the pie's raised rim.) (Courtesy of Carlo Sammarco)

"I've experimented with basically everything and it's just the most versatile, high-performance flour I've ever seen: rum cakes, fried doughnuts, 500 degrees, 900 degrees, anything," said Nicole Russell, the YouTube-trained pizzaiola behind a rarefied pizza spot in New York City that uses 100% Nuvola: her word-of-mouth, pickup-only Last Dragon Pizza, which she runs out of her home. "It's a 45-minute drive for me to the Jericho Turnpike off Cross Island and it's double the cost, but I kept my pizza prices the same. That's how much I want it. That's how much of a difference it delivers."

Nino Coniglio's The Woodstock, a pizzeria in Manhattan's trendy Meatpacking District, sells a modified 90% Nuvola slice. "We lost something in Italy and America that we're able to rediscover," said Coniglio, who field-tested Nuvola with bagels and focaccia.

And Roberto Caporuscio, who runs Kesté in Greenwich Village's who's-who hood of pizza royalty, gave his dough a cloudy kick by mixing in 25% Nuvola.

"I was not sure about Nuvola, of course, but then I tasted it. There are two people: unsure people and people who have tasted it," said Caporuscio. "You can do Neapolitan pizza with it, of course, but also New York or Roman. It's very versatile, which is important to me because we teach pizza-making classes."

Caporuscio raises an interesting point: What do people without a dog in the fight think?

"It doesn't taste at all like a Neapolitan pizza," says pizza blogger Miriam Weiskind, after taking her first bite of Coniglio's Woodstock margherita. "It has cloudiness," she said, sticking most of her index finger into a large, charred crust bubble, "but with a New York chew, a dense taste. It's gummy. It's a lot of mixed messages." She inspected it with her phone's flashlight and took a few photos.

Because Nuvola involves food in 2019, it also involves Instagram. As much as it's about taste and chemistry, it's also about visuals and novelty. For all its supporters, it is lifted highest by the power of now and the accompanying wow factor. It seems tailored for likes, if not love.

"I took the unloved crust and it made it my trademark," said Carlo Sammarco, in Italian through a translator. He is the 28-year-old pizza rookie who was the first to use Nuvola in the Neapolitan outskirts of Frattamaggiore. He dubbed the resulting pie pizza canotto (dinghy pizza, for its resemblance to a toroidal life raft.) "It takes a new person to do that. And a new flour. Nuvola made both of us lovable."

A common refrain among the Neapolitan pizza powers that be is that Nuvola is less of a rebellion or revolution than it is an evolution. In that sense, traditional Neapolitan pizza had become a flightless bird, as wondrous as an ostrich or penguin but incapable of much migration. With cloud pizza, Naples' pizza scene finally is taking flight again.


POLLO AL GUAZZETTO (Sardinian Chicken braised with Saffron)

You may see a number of Italian recipes cooked al guazzetto. This is just another Italian style of cooking.

A little bit of Italian grammar here in case you are confused: you may be familiar with other Italian culinary terms like alla romana (cooking style originating in the region of Rome, ie Roman style) alla contadina or alla paesana (peasant style) or alla campagnola (rustic or country style) – The above words are all feminine words and therefore have alla in front.

Other common terms like al forno (cooked in the oven) or al vapore (steamed) – have al in front because they are masculine words.

Al guazzetto means that it is cooked in some liquid. To confuse you even further in umido is also a culinary term that means the same thing (poached or simmered or braised). Perhaps in umido implies that it may be more slow cooked or that the liquid is significantly reduced – but perhaps I am being pedantic here.

There are many recipes for fish cooked al guazzetto and less so for meat – most contain tomatoes and broth to concentrate flavours. However, in Foods of Sicily and Sardinia and the Smaller Islands [Giuliano Bugialli, John Dominis] there is a recipe from Sardinia called Pollo o coniglio al guazzetto and this is the inspiration for the following recipe. I cooked pollo (chicken) rather than the coniglio (rabbit).

The recipe reminds me of a Sicilian way of cooking potatoes called Patati nno’ Tianu (Patate in tegame in Italian) that basically contains the same ingredients. In this recipe cubed potatoes (Italians would peel them, I do not) are placed in a heavy saucepan with a good lid. Add all of the other ingredients and cover with some water. Seal with the lid and let them cook slowly. They will absorb the water and be soft and fragrant.


Watch the video: LA PIZZAIOLA - RICETTA DELLA NONNA MARIA (December 2021).